Posts tagged as:

yvonne rainer

This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Humor, Sleaze, and Community

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on November 18, 2013
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For those of you who didn’t get tickets to Performa, we’ve got more local alternatives. We’ll have a day of humor and sleaze for Mike Kelley; a show for cyberpunk kids; and a handful of events involving important TV artists. Group Material co-founder Julie Ault will show us the meaning of collaboration, and at the Kitchen’s benefit, we’ll show the meaning of giving. And Clifford Owens is doing that performance again where he does whatever the audience tells him to, so watch out for him.

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Everything But the Art World

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on November 11, 2013
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Good news for those of you who couldn’t get tickets to Performa’s blockbusters! There are still free and open Performa events (a 24-hour group performance, a screening by the Gay Cable Network archive) and non-Performa exhibitions of puppets, comics, animation, and a queer experimental film festival.

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Friday Link Machine: Dogs, Nonsense, and Ai Weiwei

by Corinna Kirsch on February 17, 2012

  • Randy Kennedy writes a delightful piece on the bounty of dog art on view in New York museums. Aw, dog-casso. [The New York Times]
  • Get ready for a ton of Olympics-inspired art with the London 2012 Olympics. Tracey Emin’s painting a plane [FAD] and, as we posted recently, Ai Weiwei’s designing a pavilion for the games. [Arch Daily]
  • This comment thread about Nicholas O’Brien’s essay “Observations on the Proliferation of Online Galleries” is picking up steam on Google+. We plan on offering up our thoughts soon. [Google+]
  • If Transylvanian imprisonment and homosexual spies don’t pique your interest in an artist, I guess nothing will. [Interview]
  • Yesterday, House Republicans held a hearing on contraception – without any women. [The Nation]
  • Since when is the use of stock imagery in art a “relatively new phenomenon that is proliferating daily”? [Frieze]
  • This weekend at Dia: Beacon, Yvonne Rainer, that queen of proper performance art etiquette who wrote a letter dismissing Marina Abramovic, will be re-performing several of her earliest works from the 1960s, alongside several recent ones. [Dia: Beacon]
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What Actually Happened at The LA MoCA Gala

by Reid Singer on November 14, 2011
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The donor gala at the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art went off yesterday, and more or less without a hitch. It was a Jeffrey Deitch kind of night, eliciting reactions that run exactly parallel to how people feel about Jeffrey Deitch. If Deitch’s penchant for campy spectacle is not to your taste, then you probably found the treatment of naked performers distasteful. If you admire Deitch’s approach to fundraising and attention-farming, then you’d likely describe the donor gala as a success. If you’re often overcome by imbalances of power and capital in the art world, then you won’t overlook how Deitch’s employment of Abramovic, a fellow art superstar, discouragingly affirms that order.

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Yvonne Rainer’s “Salò” Reference Is Hyperbole

by Reid Singer on November 11, 2011
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Sirens are sounding as word has spread of a letter written by choreographer Yvonne Rainer to LA MoCA director Jeffrey Deitch. Rainer isn’t happy. Dismayed after hearing details of the performance artwork organized by Marina Abramovic set to take place during a donor gala for the museum, she describes the planned performance as “degrading” and “grotesque,” denouncing Abramovic’s project as “another example of the Museum's callousness and greed.” In her letter to Deitch, Rainer writes that the work of art taking place during the gala to something ‘reminiscent of ‘Salò.’”

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