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Bushwick Open Studios

Recommended Bushwick Open Studio: David McBride

by Paddy Johnson on June 1, 2012
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David McBride makes his paintings with a stencil and blue, red, and brown glaze. The result is a studio filled with what appears to be a lot of chocolate brown paint. The importance of the subjects is not immediately apparent: in one painting, he pairs a roller coaster with a clothesline of hanging flags, while in another, he fills the canvas with botanical illustrations. The key to understanding the work might be the 3D glasses painted above, which remind us that these paintings, like everything else we see, are constructed from light. It’s an almost obsessive interest in practice, and we like that.

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Recommended Bushwick Open Studio: Lee Lee Chan

by Paddy Johnson and Whitney Kimball on June 1, 2012
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LeeLee Chan’s sculpture, painting, and photos all fit squarely in the same world. The paintings and photos focus heavily on reflection, while her sculpture combines reflective, industrial items with organic elements. There’s a preciousness in her placement and handling of delicate clusters that seems to talk about both nature and commodity. Evoking the language of Eileen Quinlan, Chan’s manipulation of scale and focal length produce paintings and sculptures that seem otherworldly.

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Recommended Bushwick Open Studio: MaryKate Maher

by Paddy Johnson on May 31, 2012
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MaryKate Maher’s work is a little like a Matthew Ronay sculpture minus the steroids. She’s got the hand-made abstract sculptures and the discrete arrangements of objects, but skips the cum finish lines and hanging anal cupcake beads. Instead, Maher opts for scary. In one piece, a lamb—covered in what appears to be human flesh—has had one leg transformed into gold. In another, what appears to be a witch’s broom is coated repeatedly with black resin. When Maher tells us there’s no intended narrative, it seems like the spookiest answer possible.

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Recommended Bushwick Open Studio: Max Razdow

by Paddy Johnson and Whitney Kimball on May 31, 2012
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Gatherings of expressionistic figures communing in mythical settings define Max Razdow’s paintings and drawings. While some of his pen and ink drawings verge on storybook as in the “Future Myths” series, others are weirder, and more open to interpretation. “Man Speaking (to computer),” is one such a example, as we have no idea how to interprete a barrel-chested figure shooting blue mist out of his mouth into a black triangle. In addition to having exhibited multiple times in Belgium and Brooklyn, Max Razdow shows with Freight + Volume.

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Recommended Bushwick Open Studio: Eli Ping

by Paddy Johnson and Anthony Espino on May 30, 2012
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Do a search for Eli Ping on the Bushwick Open Studio website and his name will come back nine times. He’s in a lot of shows. None of these results though, bring back his studio, which will also be open during the event. There, an assortment of Ping’s work will be on display, many evoking a seemingly enormous number of vaginas.

We consider Ping an artist to watch. His practice is precise and deliberate, and his exploration of draped fabric, materiality, and forceful creativity, pointed. Ping shows at Susan Inglett Gallery in New York.

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Recommended Bushwick Open Studio: Max Warsh

by Whitney Kimball on May 30, 2012
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Max Warsh’s collages are so fluidly integrated that the result seems to be a liquid, or a fine mesh. Architectural grids and gates are often woven with torn chunks of stone walls, or cut shapes are dispersed on paper like a floating puzzle. Warsh brings that sensibility to architectural photographs, as well; a brick staircase, or a cropped photo of a tree trunk next to a wall, are almost indistinguishable from collage.

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Recommended Bushwick Open Studio: Björn Meyer-Ebrecht

by Paddy Johnson and Whitney Kimball on May 30, 2012
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The sheer volume of architectural references in Bjorn Meyer-Ebrecht’s work borders on obsessive. He tapes together ink renderings of institutional structures, he collages stacked chairs as though building blocks, and he builds maquettes of buildings. Even his bookshelves look more like vertical floor plans than furniture.

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Recommended Bushwick Open Studio: Ginny Casey

by Paddy Johnson and Whitney Kimball on May 30, 2012
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There are customary systems for composing an image which become clear after a long day of trolling artists’ websites— central shapes, which fit comfortably inside the edges of the picture plane, and room for the eye to move back in space. Ginny Casey’s paintings defy that mold, producing the same clunky, sentimental quality that Susan Rothenberg and Phillip Guston do so well. It’s a quality that only happens in painting.

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