Sara Jimenez, a Supplementary Biography

3 comments

Sara Jimenez, Image via Poptower

How many white, photogenic watercolorist does one show need? Sara Jimenez, Lola Thompson, and Kymia Nawabi will likely be fighting for the same spot, as they share a very similar painting style.

ART WORLD CRED

Sara earned her MFA from Parsons and ran a workshop for women in the Lower East Side in 2010.

CAREER HIGHLIGHTS

In 2007, Sara worked with Thom Sokoloski on a public installation, “The Encampment.”  In 2010, she ran Muse, a six-week workshop for women in the Lower East Side.

Sara Jimenez, Stuck, ink and watercolor on paper, 20x15", 2010

CHARACTER ASSESSMENT

Sara may be the closest to a feminist this show's gonna get, if only because of her choice in subject matter. There’s not much to say about Sara because she’s your relatable, Brooklyn neighbor: a recent college grad who probably doesn’t spend as much time in studio or building the website as she should because she’s hanging out.  And what’s wrong with that?

TYPECAST

The Other Sexpot

 

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  • Jane Jones

    Is this for real? Are you this dumb? Most of the information you include here is actually wrong … which is pathetic considering Sara’s actual bio is up for anyone to find on her Tumblr, moron… Also, 1. Sara is in her MFA program at parsons now 2. she isn’t white, she’s half filipina half white 3. she is a feminist, and has a degree in philosophy and is absolutely more of a feminist than whoever wrote this piece of garbage, the “other sexpot” really?! based on what? the fact that she’s pretty? 4. I’ve known this girl for years and she works her ass off for her art. This kid has made herself out of basically a dream and a suitcase. She’s has done more in one year than you’ve done in your entire, boring life.

    • Will Brand

      Not that this deserves a response – you clearly don’t understand how to talk to humans – but we wrote this before Bravo released so much as her last name. I think we did alright.

  • Garbanzo

    If Jane Jones wants to critique racial identification, then it should be pointed out that Filipina is a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, non-racial identity.  A Filipina could be racially classified as a Negroid if they are descended from the original Negrito natives of the islands.  If they are descended from the majority Malay population that arrived later, then they would be classified as an Austronesian.  Yet if they are descended from even later Chinese inhabitants, they would be Mongoloid; or from Spanish arrivals, they would be Caucasoid.  Without further clarification, a Filipina could be any of the four racial classifications, or any combination thereof.  

    Ultimately race is a 19th century European pseudo-science that sought to dehumanize foreign groups and legitimize their repression.  To continue to speak in terms of race is akin to addressing medical conditions in terms of the four humors.  That being said, art dealing with identity is a major segment of contemporary art production, so if we are going to talk in terms of race, at least let’s get it right and not conflate racial identity with national, cultural, ethnic, or linguistic identities.