From the category archives:

Reviews

We Went to the Lower East Side: CANADA, Thierry Goldberg, and Invisible-Exports

by Paddy Johnson Whitney Kimball and Corinna Kirsch on October 10, 2013
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Three editors trekked out to see the first fall shows in the LES. They came back with plenty of banter about some of the season’s best shows so far—at Thierry Goldberg, Invisible-Exports, and CANADA, respectively.

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We Went To Chelsea, Blue Chip Edition: Post Culture and Post-Apocalypse

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on September 27, 2013
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In which we discuss art in a normal voice. From this week’s trip (giant shows at Elizabeth Dee, Zach Feuer, and Hauser&Wirth) you might think the world is about to implode.

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What’s the Deal With the Gallery of Satan?

by Whitney Kimball on September 26, 2013
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The art world likes to give the appearance of cool omniscience, so it seems unlikely that the indoctrinated will take a shine to the Lower East Side’s Vector, the “Official Gallery of Satan.” In an art context, devil worship (especially by a bunch of twenty-somethings) typically indicates a little more emotional immaturity than we’re willing to take seriously.

That’s too bad, because as an artwork, Vector offers plenty to think about.

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Why You Should Go To Governors Island Art Fair

by Gabriela Vainsencher on September 16, 2013
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Governor’s Island Art Fair (GIAF) isn’t your typical fair. At GIAF, there are no identical dry-walled booths or uniform foam core placards. There are no stranded-looking gallery girls and boys checking their phones, and no one is ignored for not looking collector-y enough. The rooms are manned by the artists themselves or feature some kind of note on the wall thanking visitors for coming by. On the whole, artwork is installed in a way that responds to the natural light coming through windows, the slanted walls of attics, and the curving banisters in the stairwells. It’s a nice place to go.

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Book Review: Speculative Scenarios, or what will happen to digital art in the (near) future

by Corinna Kirsch on September 11, 2013
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“Curating digital artworks in physical spaces and online exhibitions is becoming more widespread, but such exhibitions mostly take place outside the world of traditional art.” This present-day dilemma posed by Independent Curator Annet Dekker forms the basis of Speculative Scenarios, or what will happen to digital art in the (near) future, a new publication that gathers responses on how to tackle digital art’s conflicted relationship to museums and more traditional, offline exhibition sites. The point is: Digital art is being shown, but museums aren’t playing a large enough role in its collection, exhibition, or conservation.

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9.5 Theses: Just a Little Radical

by Clara Olshansky on August 21, 2013
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9.5 Theses on Art and Class, by Ben Davis, editor of Artinfo, is both victim to and substantiated by Davis’s adamant worldview. Beginning with the Marxist-centric essays of the early chapters then expanding to more general issues facing the art world, the text saves itself from being an open-ended musing by framing each subject within its relationship to class ideology. This same ideology, however, leads him make some less than irrefutable claims.

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Llyn Foulkes at the New Museum: A Skilled Painter With a Simple Political Message

by Corinna Kirsch on August 21, 2013
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Llyn Foulkes’ paintings are full of quirky found objects, unexpected textures, and an unfettered, playful use of paint. But they’re not perfect. The materials can seem secondary to conveying those very simple, heavy-handed messages. I can like art that I disagree with, but Foulkes’ obsessions are at times feebly argued, and borderline crazy, making it hard to love his paintings entirely.

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First Draft: A Survey of Denver’s Artistic Talent

by Paddy Johnson on August 20, 2013
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A show in which obsessive formalism and conceptualism relentlessly call completeness into question.

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At the Bronx Museum: Another Biennial Sets Out With Heart, But Leads With Resumes

by Whitney Kimball on August 8, 2013
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In its thirty-three year run, the Bronx Museum’s AIM (Artists in the Marketplace) Program has touched a surprising extent of the New York art world. It’s rare to go on a gallery tour in this city without coming across one of its alumni, who range from establishment members like Glenn Ligon and Anton Vidokle, to rising stars like LaToya Ruby Frazier and David Gilbert. And now, AIM’s second Biennial “Bronx Calling”–a recent development for program alums–adds 73 new members to the roster. It’s a truly diverse showing of New York City-based talent getting its first leg-up into the art market. As far as the commercial art world is concerned, AIM is the Bronx Museum’s most significant contribution to New York art. So why aren’t people talking about this?

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The Equinox: A Whole Much Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts

by Clara Olshansky on August 7, 2013
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As an installation, the components of Swedish-born artist Carol Bove’s exhibition at MoMA, The Equinox, practically vibrate together; as a set of sculptures, not so much. Currently, Bove’s more monumental sculptures are on view on the High Line; in contrast, her MoMA show features seven sculptures of varied scale, all arranged seemingly randomly on an elevated, white platform.

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