Archive of Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball

Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball has written 27 article(s) for AFC.

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Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball

The Official Art Basel Miami Beach Slideshow and Commentary

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on December 6, 2013
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The best and worst of Art Basel Miami Beach 2013, in photos.

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Report From Art Basel: A Frenzied Race to Move Monotonous Art

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on December 5, 2013
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With sales of perennial brands moving faster than ever, Art Basel Miami Beach offers more of the same.

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Rafaël Rozendaal and Thanksgiving Horror

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on November 25, 2013
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Happy Thanksgiving, readers! Art events will be on the lighter side this week, but we’ve still got plenty of good holiday offerings: among them, a big Lower East Side group show (with substance), the net art event of the year at Postmasters, and a Thanksgiving slasher film in Brooklyn.

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Humor, Sleaze, and Community

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on November 18, 2013
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For those of you who didn’t get tickets to Performa, we’ve got more local alternatives. We’ll have a day of humor and sleaze for Mike Kelley; a show for cyberpunk kids; and a handful of events involving important TV artists. Group Material co-founder Julie Ault will show us the meaning of collaboration, and at the Kitchen’s benefit, we’ll show the meaning of giving. And Clifford Owens is doing that performance again where he does whatever the audience tells him to, so watch out for him.

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This Week’s Must-See Art Events: Everything But the Art World

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on November 11, 2013
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Good news for those of you who couldn’t get tickets to Performa’s blockbusters! There are still free and open Performa events (a 24-hour group performance, a screening by the Gay Cable Network archive) and non-Performa exhibitions of puppets, comics, animation, and a queer experimental film festival.

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We Went To Chelsea, Blue Chip Edition: Post Culture and Post-Apocalypse

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on September 27, 2013
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In which we discuss art in a normal voice. From this week’s trip (giant shows at Elizabeth Dee, Zach Feuer, and Hauser&Wirth) you might think the world is about to implode.

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Thursday Links: What a Sad, Sorry State of Affairs

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on May 9, 2013

  • Save Cooper Union! A large group of Cooper students and three faculty members have taken over President Jamshed Bharucha’s office, in the hopes of forcing his resignation. They report to Gothamist that they’re willing to stay as long as necessary. While Bharucha inherited massive debt, some off-the-record reports make it sound an awful lot like he’s got blood on his hands. You can follow Free Cooper Union on twitter, livestream, and facebook.
  • Save the library! Mira Schor reported from a small, poorly-attended protest yesterday to save the New York Public Library, and from the sounds of it, it’s not going well. The Central Library Plan involves demolishing the historic stacks and shipping 1.5 million books to a storage space in New Jersey. [A Year of Positive Thinking]
  • Speaking of student debt, Occupy presents Debt Fair: artist DIY booths throughout the city, with checks payable to the artist’s bank. [debtfair]
  • It’s official: come fall, Postmasters will open in its new home at 54 Franklin Street in Tribeca, a 4,500-square-foot ground floor space with Corinthian columns and sofas. [Postmasters]
  • Running for mayor seems like a game of who can apologize the most. In a public forum held this week, New York mayoral candidate Joe Lhota apologized for waging war with the Brooklyn Museum in the 1990s. While deputy mayor to Rudy Giuliani, the city pulled the museum’s funding; in turn, the museum sued. Lhota then went on to put his foot in his mouth during the same conference, referring to the Port Authority police force as “mall cops”.  [New York Daily News]
  • There’s some secret art to be found at Chelsea’s Waterside Park Playground. From 4-8 PM on Friday, the park will be home to Jasper Spicero’s “Open Shape”, an undercover exhibition of 3-D printed objects. Here’s what “Open Shape” looked like in Wichita, Kansas. [Jasper Spicero]
  • The Worst Room. [Tumblr]
  • The Guggenheim’s “Gutai: Splendid Playground” closed yesterday, but Ben Davis summed up the entire exhibition quite nicely. Gutai fizzled out in the early 1970s due to a split among factions: those who didn’t mind making tech-inspired work for government-sponsored exhibitions, and those who thought that conflicted with their progressive ideals. Today, Davis writes, Western artists are only beginning to understand Gutai’s lesson: “the price paid when critical art becomes repurposed as high-tech entertainment.” [ARTINFO]
  • The National Design Awards have been announced. [cooperhewitt]
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Appeal Finds Fair Use In Richard Prince’s “Canal Zone” Series

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on April 25, 2013
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Postmodernism is having the best day ever. It’s been just over a year since a New York District court dealt a major blow to Richard Prince, finding his Canal Zone series guilty of violating the copyright in Panamanian landscape photographs and Rastafarian portraits by Patrick Cariou. Not only was Prince found guilty, but the court ordered all unsold Canal Zone artworks and catalogs sent to Cariou so that they could be destroyed, sold, or disposed of as he saw fit. Thankfully, today sees a win for art: the case’s defendants won an appeal with the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

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Wednesday Links: Transgressions Edition

by Corinna Kirsch and Whitney Kimball on April 10, 2013
  • There goes experimentation on the Upper East Side (or, at least, it falls more to Higher Pictures and Venus Over Manhattan). Alex Zachary Peter Currie, the converted duplex gallery of Gavin Brown protegé Alex Zachary, reports that it’s “winding down operations over the next month and will not reopen.” They last told Gallerist that they were looking for a space in Harlem. [GalleristNY]
  • Want money for blogging? The Warhol Foundation’s annual Arts Writers grant application is now open. [e-flux]
  • The #1 most downloaded porno film in the Vatican is about an artist who “makes an example” of an art critic. [Gawker]
  • Grindr gets the watercolor treatment. [Tumblr via AFC Contributor Ben Macaulay]
  • This explains a lot: The New York Times exposes Twitter’s underbelly of fake accounts dealings, helping us understand why people get 20,000 new followers overnight. They’re “now getting into the retweet business.” [The New York Times]
  • Estée Lauder deepens its relationship with the Met. In a move compared to the Rockefellers, and the Annenbergs, Leonard A. Lauder has promised the museum his billion-dollar Cubist collection, said to be one of the greatest in the world. Incredibly, Lauder tells the Times that when he began his collection forty years ago, “a lot was still available, because nobody really wanted it.” [NYTimes]
  • Target deepens its relationship with art. Target, already a major supporter or the Walker and MoMA’s “Target” Free Fridays, now sponsors MoMA’s educational programs. [MoMA]
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