Massive Links: Power Talks Edition

by Paddy Johnson on October 15, 2010 · 3 comments Massive Links

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Play, The Guggenheim’s three day exhibition of videos submitted through youtube now has a blog called The Take. I’ve expressed reservations about the exhibition itself in the past — it’s not a particularly imaginative use of the Internet and many of the finalists are embarrassingly bad — and their blog only offers more reason to dislike the show.  In yesterday’s post blogger Gregory Zinman engages in the sketchy practice of providing only a general link to Joanne McNeil’s The Tomorrow Museum, and then linking to half the material she linked to herself in a post about curating. Not cool.

Here’s the youtube collaboration I wish for: YouTube and The New Museum/Riverthe.net. Riverthe.net, is an online video database conceived by Ryan Trecartin and David Karp that strings together 10 second videos uploaded by users through tag alone. It’s a great concept, but the ability to draw upon a pre-existing database would help populate the site. It needs more videos.

20×200 collaborates with Creative Time, a non-profit arts organization providing the city with public art, lead by Art Review’s 34th most powerful person, Anne Pasternak. The company will be producing a benefit edition with singer and artist David Byrne, to be released this Monday to the public. Creative Time does a lot of fantastic work in the city, so this is definitely an edition to pick up.

As one of the most prestigious summer residencies for artists in the country, I try to follow Skowhegan events throughout the year. SkowheganTALKS, is a lecture series run by the organization that features conversations between some of the most influential visual artists working today. The third talk of the second season will be conversation between artists Carrie Moyer and Mira Schor. This will take place on Sunday Oct 17th at 3 pm at The New Museum.

Hyperallergic came out with a bunch of graphs that make about as much sense as Art Review’s Power list. Not bad.

  • Gregory Zinman

    Glad to see that you’re reading The Take, Paddy. It’s been up for a few months now, and has featured some great contributions from Ryan Trecartin, Dara Birnbaum, Kentaro Ichihara, Hanne Mugaas, Olia Lialina, and Caitlin Jones, among others.

    I just wanted to clear up a few things that you mentioned in your post. I noticed that you posted the Robert Abel video that I used in the first part of “Curating Play,” without mentioning what it was, or where it came from. You also refer to me as a “blogger,” which I am not. While I have contributed, happily, to The Take, I’m an adjunct professor and PhD candidate in the Department of Cinema Studies at New York University. Perhaps most importantly, you accuse me of engaging “in the sketchy practice” of linking to Joanne McNeil’s wonderful post on curating “and then linking to half the material she linked to herself.” Yes, I mention a couple of the sources that Joanne mentions, and I linked to them as well. This is because, like Joanne, I also read blogs about curating. What is more, those sites are doing valuable work, and if linking to them results in more people reading them, then all the better. It is worth mentioning that Joanne herself was kind enough to thank me for referencing her in the comments section of my post.

    Finally, I know that you’ve been critical of Play in the past. I think if you read the second part of my post (written months ago, and posted today: http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/interact/participate/youtube-play/the-take/play/3755-curating-play-ii), you’ll see that I raise a number of issues regarding the idea behind and execution of the museum’s presentation.

    Thanks for reading,

    Greg

  • Gregory Zinman

    Glad to see that you’re reading The Take, Paddy. It’s been up for a few months now, and has featured some great contributions from Ryan Trecartin, Dara Birnbaum, Kentaro Ichihara, Hanne Mugaas, Olia Lialina, and Caitlin Jones, among others.

    I just wanted to clear up a few things that you mentioned in your post. I noticed that you posted the Robert Abel video that I used in the first part of “Curating Play,” without mentioning what it was, or where it came from. You also refer to me as a “blogger,” which I am not. While I have contributed, happily, to The Take, I’m an adjunct professor and PhD candidate in the Department of Cinema Studies at New York University. Perhaps most importantly, you accuse me of engaging “in the sketchy practice” of linking to Joanne McNeil’s wonderful post on curating “and then linking to half the material she linked to herself.” Yes, I mention a couple of the sources that Joanne mentions, and I linked to them as well. This is because, like Joanne, I also read blogs about curating. What is more, those sites are doing valuable work, and if linking to them results in more people reading them, then all the better. It is worth mentioning that Joanne herself was kind enough to thank me for referencing her in the comments section of my post.

    Finally, I know that you’ve been critical of Play in the past. I think if you read the second part of my post (written months ago, and posted the other day: http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/interact/participate/youtube-play/the-take/play/3755-curating-play-ii), you’ll see that I raise a number of issues regarding the idea behind and execution of the museum’s presentation.

    Thanks for reading,

    Greg

  • Gregory Zinman

    Glad to see that you’re reading The Take, Paddy. It’s been up for a few months now, and has featured some great contributions from Ryan Trecartin, Dara Birnbaum, Kentaro Ichihara, Hanne Mugaas, Olia Lialina, and Caitlin Jones, among others.

    I just wanted to clear up a few things that you mentioned in your post. I noticed that you posted the Robert Abel video that I used in the first part of “Curating Play,” without mentioning what it was, or where it came from. You also refer to me as a “blogger,” which I am not. While I have contributed, happily, to The Take, I’m an adjunct professor and PhD candidate in the Department of Cinema Studies at New York University. Perhaps most importantly, you accuse me of engaging “in the sketchy practice” of linking to Joanne McNeil’s wonderful post on curating “and then linking to half the material she linked to herself.” Yes, I mention a couple of the sources that Joanne mentions, and I linked to them as well. This is because, like Joanne, I also read blogs about curating. What is more, those sites are doing valuable work, and if linking to them results in more people reading them, then all the better. It is worth mentioning that Joanne herself was kind enough to thank me for referencing her in the comments section of my post.

    Finally, I know that you’ve been critical of Play in the past. I think if you read the second part of my post (written months ago, and posted the other day: http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/interact/participate/youtube-play/the-take/play/3755-curating-play-ii), you’ll see that I raise a number of issues regarding the idea behind and execution of the museum’s presentation.

    Thanks for reading,

    Greg

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